Currently viewing the tag: "podcast"

In the second season premiere of Politics for People Who Hate Politics, I had a terrible connection, and we all had technical difficulties, but then — wonder of wonders — things went really well. And that is very surprising when you consider that we were not discussing paranoia or aliens or fun stuff like that, but politics.

My panel was me (hi), Joe (he’s terse, I can be terse — once in flightschool I was laconic), Franklin Harris (assistant metro editor for the Decatur Daily News), Todd Seavey (website! book!), and Liberty.me king Jeff Tucker (also he’s at FEE now!). We covered the debates, what hope libertarians can have in politics, how much Rand Paul sucks or doesn’t, how dangerous Donald Trump is or isn’t, how Jeb Bush could possibly seem less awful than, well, anyone, and why libertarians always pick one dumb side or another. Our Better Than Politics segment was about Halloween! Spoiler alert: Jeff Tucker is a very dapper fast food item. (To be fair, that’s sort of every day, isn’t?)

Give it a watch. It was one of those fun discussion that I therefore hope is fun to watch.

Here’s the latest podcast with Sheldon Richman. In it we kind of expand on last fortnight’s chat about limited government, and delve this time into decentralization. We cover some of the uncomfortable clashes between practicality and morality there, and some weird libertarian clashes between federalism and what is wrong, period — using eminent domain and Kelo vs. New London as an interesting example — but as usual, just begin to touch the subject when the hour is mysteriously up. Check it out, and check out past chats on Liberty.me including my moderation of the left libertarianism debate between Richman and Walter Block.

Further reading material: the Roderick Long piece that Sheldon Richman used as a jumping off point for the talk.

That’s a nice face I’m making.

Anyhoo, here’s the latest podcast with Sheldon Richman. In it we chat about minarchism versus anarchism, and whether government can ever be limited. Check it out, and check out past chats on Liberty.me including my moderation of the left libertarianism debate between Richman and Walter Block.

On Friday at 9 pm, I am going to moderate a talk between Walter Block and Sheldon Richman. The topic of discussion is left libertarianism, what that is, and why some people choose that term to describe their political beliefs. If you have a question or an issue you’d like me to bring up, please leave it here. Regardless, you can — I believe — watch the talk her on Friday at 9. So, you know, do that.

  • Obama pardoned 46 drug offenders, and will continue to do the right thing — albeit excruciatingly slowly — on this American human rights disaster.
  • Conor Friedersdorf raises some fair concerns, but he had to be wrong about something. That something is legal polygamy. 
  • One time I tweet-asked Jon Ronson if I should stop trolling Bill Kristol and he responded “haha.” So I feel like I have his permission to keep being an asshole there. Generally speaking, Ronson continues to advocate for nuance and humanity in our dealings with other humans and is therefore awesome. And he had a really good conversation with Joe Rogan recently, in which they discuss THEM and So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed. Watch it! It’s really long, though, and I am not done yet. In general, though, it’s really depressing that so many people responding to Ronson seem to be personally offended that he wants us to have empathy and information before we turn another person into the number one trending topic.
  • Tavi Gevinson definitely gets why old poetry is embarrassing. 
  • If you’re somehow not tired of Donald Trump yet, Matt Welch and Jesse Walker wrote some delightfully damning pieces about him and his Freedom Fest speech debacle. Welch in particularly pulls out some of that too-often-hidden disdain. 
  • S.E. Cupp is a dope while writing about criminal justice issues. Yes, a felon who had a gun is NOT inherently a violent criminal. Let Familie Against Mandatory Minimums help you with that.
  • Martha Gellhorn. Margaret Bourke-White. My old adviser who worked for CNN. None of these women are manly enough for this author to bemoan that their day has ended. (Oh, and journalism-wise: Gellhorn>Hemingway. Even if fiction-wise it is a different story.)
  • Rand Paul disappointingly opposed to the Iran weapons deal.

Today’s video: The summer, 2003 ABC Family show The Brendan Leonard Show gave us many great moments. This is just one of them:

I realize now that I tolerate slapstick when it comes from Buster Keaton, and when it happened on this show. Deadpan is a necessary part of slapstack, otherwise it just makes me cringe into a tiny ball of sadness. Anyway, this show actually airing on cable news was a beautiful moment in early aughts history.

On Tuesday, Sheldon and I discussed the libertarian take on gay marriage, and the dangers of expanding government power even in a positive arena. We also had some fun tangents about trucking deregulation and knowing when to celebrate a victory even when it’s not a perfect one. Watch, and go read all of Sheldon’s works, starting with his blog.