In honor of the topical terrors of a new Cold War (thanks, Vlad), I offer this unsubtle — it is folk punk, so that is nearly redundant — 58 second tale of how “everybody just forgot about” nuclear weapons after a while. But those bombs are still there, and somebody might use them someday. So sleep well.

I was alive when the Berlin Wall fell, but I don’t remember it. And though I know the situation — and how the Wall came down, partially through bureaucratic error — was more complicated than just joyous people streaming through the holes their sledgehammers built, that footage never fails to bring a tear to my eye. So little world news is happy news. This was. When I build my time machine, I will definitely watch the USSR and the GDR crumble. (And again, being entirely antiwar and anti-empire doesn’t mean I can’t extra object to countries that, if nothing else, do not let their people travel freely or leave. That tells you all you need to know about a country, apologist lefties. If you can’t leave it, it’s a bad place.)

Did you fear the Russians when you were younger? And do you remember stopping at some point? It’s hard for people who don’t remember it to suss out how all-encompassing the anxiety really was, but popular culture and history so often suggest it was everywhere all the time.

  • racer texas

    I was about seven or eight when I saw Rocky IV for the first time, so it largely shaped my understanding of the Cold War. I wasn’t afraid so much as I wanted the USA to beat the Ruskies like Rocky beat Drago.

    • Lucy Steigerwald

      “I was about seven or eight when I saw Rocky IV for the first time, so it largely shaped my understanding of the Cold War.”

      America trains by running up MOUNTAINS, but the USSR has fancy gyms? (I’ve only ever seen the training montage.)